Dec 202010



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The Short Film Network Brings Award-Winning Short Films to Mainstream Audiences Around the World

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) April 6, 2006 -–

The Short Film Network (SFN), a cooperative organization dedicated to the international promotion and distribution of short films, announces its public launch to bring acclaimed short films to audiences around the world.

What is a short film? Short films are considered by many to be an avant-garde art form, typically ranging between 5 and 40 minutes in length. These films have typically served as a platform to showcase cutting edge talent, ideas and filmmaking techniques. From an experimental heyday in the 1960s and 1970s to a moribund period in the 1990s, short films are showing signs of a major revival in the art world.

“Short films are as popular as ever. We get over 4,000 shorts submissions each year and we screen less than 100,” said Mike Plante, Short Film Programmer at the Sundance Film Festival. “North America is behind Europe in terms of distributing shorts and supporting short filmmakers. Hopefully, new avenues will open up as making shorts becomes easier and cheaper.”

Enter the Short Film Network, a new distribution channel and community with one purpose: to expose general audiences to cutting edge short films while providing exposure for deserving filmmakers.

“The accessibility of talent and equipment has created a boom in short film production but most of these films are never seen beyond festivals and private screenings,” said John Montague, Founder of the SFN. “Very few of the great short films receive the exposure and praise that they deserve.”

The initial programs offered by the SFN include:

Exposure: Short Stories on Film – a monthly series of short film compilations that are sent on DVDs to subscribers via direct mail

The Short Film Academy – a community of interest for short film enthusiasts with a variety of members-only services and benefits

The Short Film Awards – an annual event that will provide significant praise and financial awards for short films and their filmmakers

More information, including a trailer with cuts from the films featured on the Exposure compilations, is available at www.ShortFilmNetwork.com.

Filmmakers are encouraged to submit their short films to SFN, both new and old, for consideration. Information regarding terms and guidelines for submissions is available on the SFN Web site.

About the Short Film Network

The Short Film Network (SFN) is a cooperative organization dedicated to provide exposure and praise for independent filmmakers through distribution and promotion of short films to broad audiences, worldwide. The programs of the SFN include the Exposure: Short Stories on Film compilations on DVD, the Short Film Academy, and the annual Short Film Awards. For more information, go to www.ShortFilmNetwork.com or call (866) 989-FILM.

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Dec 202010

JACKSONVILLE, FL (PRWEB) January 30, 2006

The 2006 Jacksonville Film Festival will once again present a broad spectrum of independent features, documentaries, international, experimental and short films as well as panels and workshops. The festival is looking for new voices and unique perspectives to enlighten and entertain the audiences of the North Coast of Florida.

Selected films will be eligible for Audience Awards for Best Documentary, Best Narrative Feature and Best Short. The official “Call for Entries” begins January 1, 2006.

Films can be submitted via WithoutaBox.com or directly to the festival. For details and more information, please visit www.jacksonvillefilmfestival.com.

In other Jacksonville Film Fest news, Northeast Florida film lovers will be celebrating the Oscars at a viewing party to benefit the Jacksonville Film Festival.

The inaugural Jacksonville Film Festival Oscar Party is Sunday, March 5 from 7:30 -11:30 p.m. at the J.Johnson Gallery in Jacksonville Beach.

Party goers can cast their predictions for Oscar winners with an interactive ballot, view the arrivals and ceremony on multiple screens from Sight and Sound, and participate in an auction featuring film memorabilia.

The event features a specialty dessert selection, gourmet coffee menu and full bar.

Tickets are limited, and are $ 100 per guest. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Jacksonville Film Festival.

For more information or to purchase tickets, please visit www.jacksonvillefilmfestival.com.

This year’s Jacksonville Film Festival is May 18-21, 2006, at various venues throughout the Downtown and San Marco neighborhoods. More than 60 feature length, short films and documentaries will be screened at six historic venues in the heart of Jacksonville.

All access passes for the Jacksonville Film Festival are $ 200, and include all screenings and events. Individual screenings are $ 8.50. For screening passes, tickets or more information, please log on to www.jacksonvillefilmfestival.com.

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Dec 172010

CANADA’S GOLDEN SHEAF AWARD WINNERS
1960

BEST FILM OF THE FESTIVAL
BEST SCIENCE

FIRST:

“UNIVERSE”
NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA
A triumph of film art, creating on the screen a vast, awe-inspiring picture of the universe as it would appear to the voyageur through space.

SECOND:

“BETWEEN THE TIDES”
UNITED KINGDOM INFORMATION SERVICE

THIRD:

“DRAMA OF METAL FORMING”
SHELL OIL COMPANY

BEST CREATIVE ARTS

“A IS FOR ARCHITECHTURE”
NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA
Architecture is traced from the pyramids through the Greek age, to the Roman, medieval and to the present-day, so-called “modern” architecture.

CATEGORY: INDUSTRY

FIRST:

“DRAMA OF METAL FORMING”
SHELL OIL COMPANY

SECOND:

“INVITATION TO THE PIANO”
EMBASSY OF JAPAN

THIRD:

“STEEL RHYTHM”
UNITED KINGDOM INFORMATION SERVICE

BEST NATURAL HISTORY

“BETWEEN THE TIDES”
UNITED KINGDOM INFORMATION SERVICE

BEST SOCIOLOGY

“SILK SCARVES OF SMYRNA”
AMBASSADE DE FRANCE AU CANADA

BEST GENERAL

“THE FACE OF SOUTH AFRICA”
SOUTH AFRICA INFORMATION SERVICES

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Dec 172010

Some cool hollywood film images:

Fort Bravo Texas Hollywood, Film Studio – Tabernas, Andalucia, Spain
hollywood film

The Saloon – Texas Hollywood Film Studios in Tabernas, Almeria Spain.
Studios used for some of the classic spaghetti westerns and more recently for the film Blueberry and TV series The Queen of Swords.

Fort Bravo Texas Hollywood, Film Studio – Tabernas, Andalucia, Spain
hollywood film

Texas Hollywood Film Studios in Tabernas, Almeria Spain.
Studios used for some of the classic spaghetti westerns and more recently for the film Blueberry and TV series The Queen of Swords.

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Dec 162010

PHOENIX, AZ, (PRWEB) June 9, 2004

El Trafico, an independent short film from Volarefilms LLC, makes its Western European premier at the 5th annual Filmstock International Film Festival in the UK. The film festival, scheduled to run from June 1st through June 15th will exhibit “El Trafico” as part of its slate of short and feature length films and documentaries.

Directed by first time filmmaker Marco Santiago, the story reflects the growing violence involved in the trafficking of humans. Set in Southern Arizona, the story depicts a young boy who gets caught-up in the underworld of human traffickers. “El Trafico” is one of a series of short films directed by Marco Santiago that deal with immigration issues in the United States, human trafficking in general, and their associated violence. “We feel that this film is as timely as you can get considering the current events in the United States and the rest of the world, and Filmstock is a great place to premier this film.” says Marco Santiago, director of “El Trafico”. “El Trafico is only the beginning. The plan is to continue to crank out content that is relevant, creative, and emotionally impacting.” he continues.

Along those lines, Volarefilms LLC is currently in production of a feature length documentary film titled “Into the Border”. In production since July 5th 2003, the documentary deals explicitly with the border issues in Arizona. Also in Production is a short film titled “Once Upon a Time in the Desert”, set to complete filming at the end of June, as well as a 30 minutes short film titled “86″, set to go into production in the September/October time frame. Volarefilms is also developing a feature length film, titled “Volare”, set to go into production in mid 2005.

For more information regarding the short film “El Trafico”, or for a copy of the “El Trafico” Press Kit, visit http://www.volarefilms.com/Projects/ElTrafico1/eltrafico.htm or contact Marco Santiago. IMDB information can be obtained at

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0411992/

Volarefilms LLC is an Arizona based independent film company engaged in the development and production of feature length motion pictures, film shorts, and documentaries with the aim of creating works that are commercially viable, culturally significant, intellectually satisfying, and emotionally impacting.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Marco Santiago

Volarefilms LLC

480-229-3143

http://www.volarefilms.com

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Dec 162010



San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) May 21, 2007

San Francisco, California, scene of the best independent and artistic films is home to a new production company, Imaginative Productions. Short on dollars and long on talent and inspiration, new writer Tonya Foster, with her first screenwriting effort, Knocked Up, in 3 episodes at the Cannes Festival.

Tonya Foster, writer and also starring in 2 of the three episodes, a bay area resident and part of the newly formed Imaginative Productions travels to the prestigious Cannes Film Festival to represent her film at the short film corner.

Katarina Fabic, co-director and editor, also starring in the film is also in France. This is Katarina’s first time at the Cannes Film Festival. Katarina, a successful actress, will be making in roads and contacts for distribution of Knocked Up for all of us at the festival. Katarina can be found on the Shari Carlson Players Directory.

Taylor Meritt, an actress with the Shari Carlson Studio, is co-producer on Knocked Up, and was already set to go to the festival for her film, Knock Off, also at the short film corner.

Shari Carlson Studio trains talented performers from all over the world. Shari has a San Francisco Studio and a Hollywood Studio. Shari grew up in Hollywood and prefers San Francisco as a home base for the quality of life and the artistic integrity of the talent. Here you find some of the most unique and gifted talents in the world. It is almost as if they are attracted here by some cosmic invitation. The talent in the bay area thinks for themselves and are a truly creative gift to any production.

Shari Carlson, Producer, Director, and the DP on Knocked Up, has trained each of the Actors and was thrilled to direct them on the set. These actors come with an open, easy to direct presence that inspires everyone to a new level of creativity.

Shockingly these three films finished on an operating budget of 1,500 dollars, (not a typo) competing with multi million dollar productions.

No one else could have made a film like this on so little money.

Imaginative Productions / Imaginative Films

www.imaginativeproductions.com

www.imaginativefilms.com

588 Sutter Street

Suite 325

San Francisco, CA 94102

888-410-8355

Shari Carlson Studio

www.sharicarlson.com

588 Sutter Street

SF, CA 94102

Suite 327

San Francisco, CA 94102

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Dec 142010

 

CANADA’S GOLDEN SHEAF AWARD WINNERS
1962

BEST FILM OF THE FESTIVAL

“HOLD BACK THE SEA”
SHELL OIL OF CANADA

BEST AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRY

“ROUGHNECKS”
NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA

“SYMPHONY JAPAN”
EMBASSY OF JAPAN

BEST CREATIVE ARTS

“DELACROIX”
FRANCE

BEST NATURAL HISTORY

“SEA SANCTUARY”
BRITISH INFORMATION SERVICES

BEST SOCIOLOGICAL

“THE TEST”
NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA

HONOURABLE MENTION:
“CHILDREN’S SONGS OF JAPAN”

BEST GENERAL

“CIRCLE OF THE SUN”
NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA

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Dec 142010

Some cool movie images:

(#20 of 365) Movie Night
movie

I just realized I did two movie themed pictures in a row. Oh well. It’s late, and I’m tired.

My own road movie #2.
movie

Made it on Explorer: December 5, 2007
Check the whole set:
My Own Road Movie

2009 in movies
movie

Maybe there’s a rainstorm to duck. Or maybe there’s a just an empty afternoon to fill. Or a bad day at work and the only cure is two hours in E Street. Whatever the reason, or for no reason at all, I see a lot of movies. Last year, I drew up a list of my top 5 movies; this year, it’s not so straightforward.

This year, it’s all about the moments. The scenes. The fleeting moods that stick after the lights are back up and the popcorn grease has been washed away.

Like the dance scene in "(500) Days of Summer." In a movie packed with beautiful images–and a soundtrack I’m still listening to almost daily–this scene accomplished the impossible: It put Hall and Oates on my top-played songs of the year.

Or the opening credit sequence from "The Watchmen." The movie couldn’t live up to 20 years of hype (didn’t stand a chance, really), but for five minutes there, boy, didn’t we all have our hopes up while Bob Dylan was singing?

Come to think of it, music matters so much with these scenes. "It Might Get Loud," one of the best movies I saw this year, was a masterpiece of music-lover porn, those three men and their beautiful, beautiful guitars.

The relationships matter, too: The pairing in "Paper Heart" was sweetly honest and brutal; Carl Fredricksen and his wife in "Up" brought me to tears.

Sometimes it’s that very last scene that reinforces a great movie, or makes an OK one seem better. "Up In The Air" ended exactly how I wanted it to; "Adam" saved itself when the boy didn’t get the girl.

Sometimes it’s just about casting: Meryl Streep in "Julie and Julia"? Perfect. The surprise cameo by [you know who] in "Zombieland"? YES! And "Adventureland" made me not hate Ryan Reynolds for the first time, like, ever.

Other movies build to a sense of their goodness: "Coraline" made me hopeful for a generation of kids growing up now; "Moon" took what could have been a bad "Outer Limits" episode and made it so much more.

And then there’s the joyride. "Public Enemies" was a mess, but with Johnny Depp walking around as a ’30s gangster, who cares? "Sherlock Holmes" spent more money and time on costumes than plot, but I’m OK with that. "Brothers Bloom" put Adrien Brody and Mark Ruffalo in matching fedoras and taught Rachel Weitz how to juggle.

The silliest movie can have such beauty. "Night At the Museum" gave us a peek inside the VJ Day in New York, and it brought to life those Degas ballerinas I pass so often at the National Gallery.

And the most serious movie on the most serious subject–"Hurt Locker–can surprise you. Sigh, another war movie? How’s this one different? Turns out, it’s different in the most significant way possible: it tells a story you care about, with people you care about. That’s exactly what i want from two hours in the dark.

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Dec 142010

Check out these new release movie images:

PhotonQ-AVATAR
new release movie

In Paris last night, for the 3D mind-blowing preview of AVATAR ,James Cameron ‘s new movie. A great experience before the worldwild release of the movie on the 16th of Decembre =) (notice M.Soleil ‘s make-up, for the occasion =P )

Here is the teaser-trailer.(not the same without the 3D experience =)

The technology behind the movie is expected to be revolutionary. James Cameron originally attempted to get this film made in 1999 as his immediate follow-up to Titanic (1997). However, at the time, the special effects he wanted for the movie ran the proposed budget up to 0 million. No studio would fund the film, and it was subsequently shelved for almost ten years.
Seeing the character of Gollum in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) convinced James Cameron that CGI effects had progressed enough to make Avatar. …

"Tired of waiting for technology to catch up, James Cameron co-developed a new generation of stereoscopic cameras :The Fusion digital 3-D camera system.

Simplified, this is the equivalent of two cameras strapped together, each providing a slightly different perspective on the scene, mimicking the way human eyes view the world in three dimensions.

Now the entire screen have depth, taking on the appearance of a window through which the viewer is watching a ‘world’ on the screen, with a distinct foreground and background, rather than a flat, moving painting.

Add to the experience the new polarising glasses, untinted, which do not cause the headaches experienced in the past, or more importantly rely on frequent ‘pans’ of the camera to make the image appear in 3D.

Each lens has a different filter , which removes different part of the image as it enters each eye. This gives the brain the illusion it is seeing the picture from two different angles, creating the 3D effect." telepresenceoptions-com

Here you’ ll find a short video on the new 3-D camera technology behind James Cameron’s upcoming film Avatar.

Movies
new release movie

This are the current movies releases. I went to see the new Karate Kid movie. Another alternatives for the evening were: Inception, Predators, Toy Story 3 and Eclipse. Any Twilight Saga fans?

The original article for this picture lives at www.animoe.net/2010/08/movies.html

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Dec 132010



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The Acorn Penny heads to the Los Angeles Womens International Film Festival

The Acorn Penny: Kinshasa (Jada Young) in IDP camp (Photo Laufer Film, 2009)

Cleveland, OH (Vocus) March 24, 2010

THE ACORN PENNY, a short film by filmmaking father – daughter team, LAUFER FILM will have it’s next festival screening March 27th at the Los Angeles Women’s International Film Festival. It is playing at the Laemmles Sunset 5 theater in the Shorts Program 2 at 3:15 pm.

The Alliance of Women Filmmakers Inc., a non-profit 501c(3) organization is the producer of the LA Womens International Film Festival. The group established the festival to empower women filmmakers to create diverse roles for women as well as increase exposure for women made movies. AFI trained cinematographer and director Tiff Laufer is a both successful filmmaker and a perfect fit for the festival.

The Acorn Penny is a visionary short film helmed by AFI graduate Tiffany Ann Laufer. The movie takes a unique view about a young Congolese girl who is forced to live in an IDP (Internally Displaced Persons) camp due to the civil war in her native land. “We felt strongly that this story should be brought to the forefront, but in a way to which western audiences could relate,” said Producer William C. Laufer. “estimates suggest that 5.9 million people have died in the DRC over the past decade”. The UN is spending a billion dollars a year just in the Congo – we felt this was a story that needed to be told,” Laufer said. The film includes footage from the Cleveland Museum of Art collections archive and actual footage from Congolese refugee camps, footage provided by the United Nations High Commission on Refugees.

Director / writer Tiffany Ann Laufer uses thirteen (13) year old actress Jada Young to tell the story of Kinshasa, a young girl who is at first seen as an ordinary American youth but whose different reality is gradually revealed and whose true situation becomes arrestingly apparent. Ms. Laufer uses four magical acorns, both real and computer generated, to lead and guide Kinshasa thru this world and her adventure. Tiffany Laufer said, “I was very much inspired by Guillermo Del Toro’s ‘Pan’s Labyrinth’ and finding that perfect balance in magical realism is very important in capturing your audience’s imagination. We didn’t want to focus on the war in the DRC, but on the dreams that still exist in the children who have survived the atrocities.”

The film was well received at the second annual Amelia Island Film Festival where Michelle Eggers of the Jacksonville Nassau Sun called the Acorn Penny “more pressing, a movie which guides viewers through the metaphorical journey of a young African refugee and her magical acorn.” Asked about her motivation for the movie, Tiffany Laufer said “I originally hoped to produce a feature-length film on genocide in the Congo, but because of the immediacy of the issue, created a short instead.” “This message is too important to wait,” Laufer said, “I knew that I needed to get it out to people as quickly as possible.” In a similar statement of pressing need, Ben Affleck, an early inspiration to Laufer, has just founded the East Congo Initiative to help raise fund and awareness about issues facing the people in the Congo.

The short film was also selected to be shown at the “Short Film Corner” a market for short films to be held at the Cannes International Film Festival, May 12 – 22nd.

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Vocus, PRWeb and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.

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