Jun 222011



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Acorn Penny Screens at Cleveland Museum of Art











Jada Young / Photo by William Laufer, Laufer Film 2010


Cleveland, OH (Vocus) August 4, 2010

The Acorn Penny, a short film by filmmaking father – daughter team Laufer Film, will have its Cleveland premier at the Cleveland Museum of Art on Friday, August 13th, 2010. The short will play in front of the Brazilian feature documentary Only When I Dance.

The movie recently won first prize in the Twin River’s Film fest. Joanna Connors of the Cleveland Plain Dealer

“Though news reports from the war in the Congo depict a nightmare of atrocities, Laufer was determined to make a film that would alert viewers to the war without using violence.”

The movies also was shown at the Los Angeles Women’s International Film Festival and was well received at the second annual Amelia Island Film Festival. The film was covered in Michelle Egger’s article for the Jacksonville Nassau Sun. The short film was also selected to be shown at the “Short Film Corner” a market for short films held at the Cannes International Film Festival, May 12 – 22nd.

The Acorn Penny is a short film of hope. An artistic work of fiction that shines a light on a forgotten part of the world. A call to aid for the living and a remembrance of the estimated 6.9 million people who have died in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 1998 in what is called the Mineral Wars.

The Acorn Penny is a wondrous story of the power of a child’s dream to save herself and the world around her. When four magical acorns fall to her feet, Kinshasa’s dream of the future unfolds into an adventure she never imagined she could call her own. As she rediscovers her African past, the war torn present and her wondrous potential she realizes she must fight the forces that stand in her way, for no one else will.

This award winning short film was shot on the Red Camera utilizing background plates from the United Nations High Commission on Refugees, and the Cleveland Museum of Art. The Acorn Penny successfully brings together a dream world and a reality that viewers are immediately drawn into. This beautiful story of the potential of one girls dreams of the future is not to be missed.

The Acorn Penny recently won 1st place at the Twin Rivers Media Festival in Asheville, North Carolina. Playing to an embracing crowd, this short film of just fourteen minutes has open hearts and minds to the enormity of the crisis happening in the DRC, Democratic Republic of the Congo in regards to the mining of Conflict Minerals and the plight of women in this worn torn country.

The Acorn Penny has actively handed out information from two non-for profits that are currently working in the Congo. The Hope For The Congo program based in Washington DC and the International Relief Commission in New York City. Its been important, whenever our film screens that we have information about agencies that are playing a part in the recovery and healing of the DRC. Laufer said “We’ve been spreading the word, and hopefully people have learned something new about this conflict after attending our screenings.”

LauferFilm.com was founded in 1996 by Georgetown University grads Bill and Tiffany Laufer. Bill and Tiffany Laufer are a father – daughter film team who recently finish the new Christmas feature film Christmas at Maxwell’s.

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Jun 212011

The tamil movie Endhiran, which got rave reviews from critics around the world, is not a remake of Super Star Upendra Kannada film’s Hollywood. Previously it was rumored that it was a remake of the Kannada film. Although it is claimed that Rajinikanth and Aishwarya Bachchan rigid film is totally an original creation of the renowned director Shankar, one can not deny the fact that some of the striking similarities between the two films. Below are some of the similarities and differences between the two films.

In Hollywood Upendra played three roles, ie two people and a robot, while in Endhiran Rajini appears in two get ups like scientists and an android. A monkey plays a central role in Hollywood, and it goes, secrets and hidden agendas of the people and conveys the information to the Android. Where, as a mosquito plays the same role in Rajini film to the same job as monkey in Hollywood.

The robots in the two films are created to serve two different purposes of man. In Hollywood, Surendra (Upendra) in love with Manisha (Felicity Mason), but he is very shy and timid, she hesitates to express his love. To impress her, he seeks the help of his maverick scientist Professor (Ananth Nag), who creates his look-alike robots. While in Endhiran, Vaseekaran (Rajinikanth) itself is a scientist. Ignore his beloved Sana (Aishwarya Bachchan), he fought for five years for a humanoid robot that can be used in the Indian army, create to serve the society.

Humanoid robot in the two films have several qualities. You could understand the verbal commands and can act accordingly, like any other human being. They could dance, fight to understand several languages and have good memory. But in Endhiran Robot has tremendous qualities and is more powerful than those in Hollywood.

In Hollywood, the increase is Surendra’s scientists clone robots to think on his ability to act and how to win people to Manisha emotional. He gives the clone, the robot called U.S. 47 with a human discretion and emotion. In Endhiran, vase and upgrades, the robot called Chitti by including emotions such as anger, sorrow, love, kiss, to the robot by his professor (Danny Denzongpa) refused permission when the robot has no emotions, and it might even kill his own officers of the army.

With its Android strength and human intelligence, the robot U.S. 47 in Hollywood proves to be formidable enemy to his own creator and his followers. The robot developed love for Manisha and it goes out independently functioning programs at their own risk and it turns human society. In Endhiran vase destroyed the robot and dumped in the rubbish bin, if it is against his will. Chitti rise from waste and caused more destruction. Finally, the robot sacrificed his life for Surendra Chitti removed while in vase and places it in the display case, if it turns dangerous for society.

However, both Endhiran and Hollywood science fiction movie. But you can not stop using diffracted from the kind of technology in Endhiran. The graphic work used in the field of Endhiran Hollywood film industry. The robot in this film is a Spiderman Superman Terminator Godzilla. It is more powerful than all these beings. It can slide on the rails that run horizontally on a moving train, transformation in Anaconda can swallow even helicopters and fire at people with his fingers, without using a gun.

Finally, one can say that in spite of similar properties, not Endhiran is a remake of Kannada film Hollywood. The film has a different theme, story and characters. In addition, it has sound technology used in Hollywood movies. Beware of Shankar and Rajinikanth for producing such a brilliant film, making proudly South Indians on the national and international level.

Moore: Rocky Mountain Rep opens plush new Grand Lake digs
The June 10 opening of the $ 5.2 million, 296-seat new Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre drew a packed house, and each attendee seemed to have played some part in willing this theater into existence. That and other news of the week.

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Jun 212011

A few nice British film images I found:

BFI104_lowres


BFI, J Paul Getty Jnr Conservation Centre

BFI094_lowres


BFI, J Paul Getty Jnr Conservation Centre

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Jun 182011
short film
by Canadian Film Centre

Roman Polanski was born in Paris in 1933 to a Polish father and to a Russian mother, when he was four, the family moved to Krakow in Poland. They were living there in 1939 when World War II broke out, the Polanskis were forced into the Krakow ghetto with thousands of other Polish Jews by the Nazi invaders. Tragically, his parents were eventually sent to the concentration camps, his father survived but his mother was murdered at Auschwitz-Birkenau. The young Polanski managed to escape the Krakow ghetto with the help of a Polish Roman Catholic farmer who hid him in his outhouses, Polanski later wandered the Polish countryside for the duration of the war, managing to find shelter and sustenance with Catholic families. After the war, he was re-united with his father and moved back to Krakow. He began to become involved in acting and with the help of the great Polish film director, Andrzej Wajda was accepted into the Lodz Film School. It soon became apparent that Polanski had found his medium, the short films which he made while there being critically lauded. His first feature, Knife in the Water (1962) was what would become known as pure Polanski; a moody, brooding, smothering piece which explored the dark side of the human psyche and the seedy underbelly that belies human contact and relationships. It was almost all shot and set on the spatially controlled environment of a boat. The movie proved to be an international commercial success and it picked up an Academy nomination for Best Foreign Language Film.

After making Knife on the Water (1962) Polanski moved to England where he made three films in succession based on original scripts written by him and his regular collaborator Gerard Brach. Polanski landed in London slap bang in the middle of Beatlemania and the swinging sixties. However, Polanski didn’t give a toss what was going on, he was possessed of a vision and he wasn’t about to drop it. His Repulsion (1965), starred Catherine Deneuve being terrified and wore it’s Surrealist influences on it’s sleeve as well as the earlier horrors and psychological thrillers of Bunuel, Cocteau and Hitchcock. His 1966 effort Cul-de-Sac was inspired by Beckett’s Waiting for Godot and Pinter’s The Birthday Party and was no fun to make, just ask Donald Pleasance who lodged complaints over Polanski’s manic method of directing. It was on the set of this technically dazzling horror spoof The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967) where he met the beautiful actress Sharon Tate whom he fell in love with and married, she was his second wife after his earlier marriage to Barbara Lass. The couple moved to the Hollywood Hills, Polanski accepted a script entitled Rosemary’s Baby (1968) which Hitchcock had earlier turned down. Polanski threw himself into his work, the Hollywood crew were quite startled at his knowledge of all facets of filmmaking. Once again he illustrated his devotion to the truth forcing his leading lady, Mia Farrow to eat raw liver and she, the poor girl an avid vegetarian. The film earned another Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay, the boy had arrived in the Hollywood set.

 After the great success of Rosemary’s Baby (1968), a terrible tragedy was to befall Polanski’s life when on 9 August 1969, his wife Sharon who was eight months pregnant with their first child was brutally murdered along with four other people by members of Charles Manson’s cult ‘The Family’. Polanski, absolutely devastated, gave away all his possessions and returned to Europe, broken-hearted. He made two movies, Macbeth (1971) and What? (1972) before returning to Hollywood to direct the tour de force that was Chinatown (1974). Polanski once again refused to be influenced by what was in vogue and was not attracted by the stylistic freedoms of the New Wave filmmakers. He filmed with wide angle lenses, bright lights and precise framing but the film was a wolf in sheep’s clothing, it was pure noir, launching a scathing attack on the American Dream, it was one of the most important films of the era, it was nominated for eleven Academy Awards. Soon after the release of Chinatown, Polanski was charged with unlawful sexual intercourse with a thirteen year old girl, he fled to Europe settling in France, the US authorities issued a request for his extradition which the French authorities turned down. Polanski now works and travels in countries that he cannot be extradited from, such as France, Poland and Germany. He immediately continued to work, making the claustrophobic The Tenant (1976) about a transvestite tenement dweller which once again explored the theme of urban alienation. He followed it with the curious choice of an adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles.

 

Tess (1979) received several Academy Award nominations including Best Picture andwon Oscars for best cinematography and best art direction, once again Polanski’s star appeared undimmed. However, he then disappeared from the film game for seven years and when he did return it was with the critical and commercial disaster that was Pirates (1986). It was the first time that a Polanski film was not well received, however he quickly recovered and followed it up with the critically acclaimed Hitchcockian-like Frantic (1988) starring Harrison Ford and Emmanuelle Seigner. Polanski and Seigner fell in love, were later married and have two children. Back on form, he cast Seigneur again in the strangely compelling Bitter Moon (1994); returned to his bizarre, triangular, paranoid , smothering pieces of before with Death and the Maiden (1994); and The Ninth Gate (1999) which although was originally perceived as a lacklustre Polanski has since begun to gather a cult following. He cemented his place among the pantheon of the world’s finest directors when his 2002 film The Pianist won the Palme d’Or, Cesar for Best Film and the Academy Award for Best Director. He did not attend the Oscar ceremony for fear that he would be arrested as there were still demands for his extradition by the US authorities. In The Pianist, Polanski returned to the horrific ground and terrible memories of his childhood in Nazi occupied Poland during World War II. Similarly perhaps in remembrance of his childhood, Polanski directed Oliver Twist (2005), he is currently working on The Ghost which is due for release in 2010.

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Jun 182011



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box[ur]shorts Announces 1st Awards Night in Hollywood — International Festival ‘Boxes’ Short Films, Creates New Platform for Viewers at Restaurants, Coffee Houses & Laundromats











Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) December 1, 2006

box[ur]shorts Film Festival, a yearlong short film exhibition taking place internationally at restaurants, bars, coffee houses and laundromats in cities from Los Angeles and New York to Basel, Switzerland and Hiroshima, Japan, today announced its first annual awards night will take place at the Karma Coffeehouse, 1544 N Cahuenga Blvd, in Hollywood on Tuesday, December 19. Doors open at 6 pm and the event starts at 7.

box[ur]shorts, a new form of short film exhibition and concept created by festival directors Giacun Caduff and Ryan Reichenfeld, is an innovative approach to watching movies that becomes part of viewers’ everyday experiences — something one can do while waiting for a table at a restaurant or hanging out at a favorite coffee house.

“Our goal is to bring short films to new audiences and to establish a direct connection between filmmakers and their viewer. We do this by screening at places where the audience has time to watch a short; be that at a coffee shop, laundry store, bar, etc. It’s entertainment to bridge waits along with online streaming of the films – this is how we hope to create a new platform for short films,” says Caduff.

On the box[ur]shorts concept, Denise Mann, Co-chair, Producers Program, and Assistant Professor, UCLA Department of Film, TV and Digital Media comments, “The art-house is no longer hidden away in some small, dank theater, but readily available. There’s an immediacy to this way of experiencing film that is refreshing and exciting.”

box[ur]shorts Film Festival has shown all competing movies during the year in artistic movie jukeboxes at international locations. The films are programmed in four seasons and loop non-stop on different size LCD screens inside boxes and also gives the viewer an option to make a selection from an interactive menu.

The first box[ur]shorts Film Festival Award Night will open its doors for the public to enjoy their top 15 movies on the big screen. Pre-registration to attend the private party event is required at http://www.boxurshorts.com. Chosen by an industry panel of diverse judges, the films will be lined up in a countdown screening for the evening. Based on the judges’ selections, filmmakers will be awarded Golden, Silver, and Bronze box[ur]shorts trophies. And, one filmmaker will receive the box[ur]shorts Audience Award as voted on and selected by the audience both online and that evening. Access more information about box[ur]shorts Film Festival at: http://www.boxurshorts.com

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Jun 182011



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Brubaker Films, in association with T-Street Productions, gain acceptance into the 2004 Los Angeles International Short Film Festival.











HOLLYWOOD, CA (PRWEB) July 30, 2004

“Earl’s Your Uncle” was written by Jared Tweedie, directed by Thomas Phillips and produced by

Jason P. Brubaker of Brubaker Films LLC, in association with T-Street Productions.

A very prestigious invitation, the Los Angeles International Short Film Festival is sanctioned by The Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences. In the past, nineteen of the films screened have been nominated for Oscars in the best short film category. Five have won.

Earl’s Your Uncle is a sort-of-film-noir-comedy with a fantastical edge exposing the dark underbelly of crime, deceit, malice, mayhem and wellÂ… stale doughnuts. The film was shot in b/w Super 16mm during March 2004.

Brubaker is excited. “The crew has worked very hard to make this happen. I couldn’t have asked for a better, more talented team. Tom and Jared deserve this. They work very hard. And the LA Short Fest is an honor.”

Phillips says he really enjoys working with Brubaker because he is so supportive and encouraging. “All I know is this… When Brubaker says he is going to do something, he does it. No excuses. He takes the good with the bad. I can’t wait to read Seven Ten Split and move into a feature.” (Brubaker is currently packaging his feature project, Seven Ten Split. The film is slated for production in Brubaker’s hometown of York, Pennsylvania in September 2005).

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Jun 152011

Yorkton Short Film & Video Festival nominated for prestigious arts award

The Yorkton Short Film & Video Festival is in the running for one of this year’s prestigious Lieutenant Governor’s Arts Awards.

“This nomination is a great acknowledgment for the festival’s remarkable history and accomplishments,” says Fay Kowal, Executive Director of the Yorkton Short Film & Video Festival. “We are very excited and honoured to be a nominee, especially as we prepare to celebrate our 60th year.”

The festival is one of three nominees in the Innovation in the Arts category. Presented annually, these awards recognize the contribution and achievements made by individuals, groups and organizations to the arts.

The longest running festival of its kind in North America, the Yorkton festival is well known for its numerous achievements in furthering the art of filmmaking. In the 60 years of its existence the festival has developed a tradition of recognizing excellent films and providing a great professional development and learning opportunity. Each year the festival recognizes outstanding Canadian short films and rewards the very best with the Golden Sheaf Awards.

Yorkton provides a unique setting for filmmakers and industry professionals to meet and share ideas. This year the festival takes place May 24 to 27.

For more information please contact:
Fay Kowal
Executive Director
Email: director@yorktonshortfilm.org
Telephone: (306) 782-7077

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Jun 142011



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box[ur]shorts Announces 1st Awards Night in Hollywood — International Festival ‘Boxes’ Short Films, Creates New Platform for Viewers at Restaurants, Coffee Houses & Laundromats











Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) December 1, 2006

box[ur]shorts Film Festival, a yearlong short film exhibition taking place internationally at restaurants, bars, coffee houses and laundromats in cities from Los Angeles and New York to Basel, Switzerland and Hiroshima, Japan, today announced its first annual awards night will take place at the Karma Coffeehouse, 1544 N Cahuenga Blvd, in Hollywood on Tuesday, December 19. Doors open at 6 pm and the event starts at 7.

box[ur]shorts, a new form of short film exhibition and concept created by festival directors Giacun Caduff and Ryan Reichenfeld, is an innovative approach to watching movies that becomes part of viewers’ everyday experiences — something one can do while waiting for a table at a restaurant or hanging out at a favorite coffee house.

“Our goal is to bring short films to new audiences and to establish a direct connection between filmmakers and their viewer. We do this by screening at places where the audience has time to watch a short; be that at a coffee shop, laundry store, bar, etc. It’s entertainment to bridge waits along with online streaming of the films – this is how we hope to create a new platform for short films,” says Caduff.

On the box[ur]shorts concept, Denise Mann, Co-chair, Producers Program, and Assistant Professor, UCLA Department of Film, TV and Digital Media comments, “The art-house is no longer hidden away in some small, dank theater, but readily available. There’s an immediacy to this way of experiencing film that is refreshing and exciting.”

box[ur]shorts Film Festival has shown all competing movies during the year in artistic movie jukeboxes at international locations. The films are programmed in four seasons and loop non-stop on different size LCD screens inside boxes and also gives the viewer an option to make a selection from an interactive menu.

The first box[ur]shorts Film Festival Award Night will open its doors for the public to enjoy their top 15 movies on the big screen. Pre-registration to attend the private party event is required at http://www.boxurshorts.com. Chosen by an industry panel of diverse judges, the films will be lined up in a countdown screening for the evening. Based on the judges’ selections, filmmakers will be awarded Golden, Silver, and Bronze box[ur]shorts trophies. And, one filmmaker will receive the box[ur]shorts Audience Award as voted on and selected by the audience both online and that evening. Access more information about box[ur]shorts Film Festival at: http://www.boxurshorts.com

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Jun 142011



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Hip-Hop Music Video is Taking Top Honors — Carrying a Human Rights Message Worldwide










Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) December 6, 2005

The UNITED music video, which screened in September at Hollywood’s Arclight Theater Los Angeles International Short Film Festival to thunderous applause, has now taken the Slate Award for best music video at the 2005 California Independent Film Festival. Classed as a short film, UNITED has already copped top awards in more than a dozen film festivals, including the Gandhi Cultural 3rd International Film Festival in Spain, the Giglio D’Oro Film Festival in Italy and the New York International Independent Film and Video Festival.

At its debut during an international youth summit held at the United Nations headquarters, the New York Office High Commissioner for Human Rights called UNITED “a huge step forward for human rights education.” Add subtitling in 15 languages accomplished with support from the Human Rights Department of the Church of Scientology, it has been able to spread its message to discos in Spain, soccer stadiums in Italy, even electronics stores in Hungary and Russia. In addition to honors, kudos have poured in from many notables, including the Prince of Monaco, the Governor of California and the Mayor of Los Angeles. Add to that a long list of police, community and youth groups in dozens of countries seeking to spread its peaceful answers and UNITED is transformed into a virtual human rights movement powered by a hip-hop rhythm that appears to be reaching everyone.

Out of thousands of short films vying for honors, UNITED has proven it has what it takes to stand out. “This production required a 45,000-mile world tour covering four continents and 13 countries. It engaged two thousand volunteers and 150 actors who contributed their time to a global endeavor,” says Leslie Brown, UNITED’s producer. “With a director and crew that consisted mostly of teenagers and pre-teens, it was truly a youth project,” Brown added. Director Taron Lexton, founder of TXL Films, was 19 years old when he shot UNITED in 2004.

Though global in scope, the story depicts an inner-city kid with a heart for basketball (played by 11-year-old Andre Boydon). He is confronted by a gang of bullies and their leader (Eric Forte), and must fight for his right to play. “What makes UNITED a great human rights video is how Boydon’s character accomplishes this without violence and how he involves the whole world to win,” says Brown.

The UNITED music video was commissioned by Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) to accompany a new theme song designed to teach human rights to youth. In a recent interview, the President of YHRI, Mary Shuttleworth, said, “Human rights is something I feel very passionate about. As humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard stated, ‘Human rights must be made a fact, not and idealistic dream.’” The film features cameo performances by lsaac Hayes, Erika Christensen, Jenna Elfman, Catherine Bell, and Linsey Bartilson. For more information about UNITED log on to http://www.unitedmusicvideo.org.

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Jun 122011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: March 26, 2007

Renowned Canadian filmmaker Allan King headlines Yorkton Festival

Yorkton, SK – Legendary Canadian filmmaker Allan King is attending a special anniversary screening of his classic film Who Has Seen The Wind at this year’s Yorkton Short Film & Video Festival, May 24 to 27.

One of the most influential and important figures in Canadian cinema, King will field questions following the screening and will instruct a master class at the festival.

“It’s a great privilege to welcome such a prominent Canadian filmmaker as Mr. King to join us for our 60th anniversary celebrations,” says Fay Kowal, Executive Director of the Yorkton Short Film & Video Festival. “He is one of the most innovative directors in the history of Canadian cinema and his knowledge and expertise will be of great value to experienced and up-and-coming filmmakers.”

With a career spanning 50 years, King is renowned for making great dramas and provocative documentaries. His numerous accolades include the Prix d’art et d’essai at Cannes and lifetime achievement awards from Hot Docs, Arts Toronto, and the Directors Guild of Canada. King was named an Officer of the Order of Canada. After Who Has Seen The Wind, King focused on drama and television before returning to documentary filmmaking. His recent films include the groundbreaking and often controversial documentaries Memory, Dying at Grace and EMPz 4 Life.

The screening of Who Has Seen the Wind marks 30 years since the release of this Canadian classic, which earned a Golden Reel Award for being the highest grossing Canadian film in 1977. Set in depression-era Saskatchewan, the touching and emotional film is based on W.O. Mitchell’s novel of the same name and follows a young boy as he learns about life and death on the prairies. An important part of the history of Saskatchewan’s film industry, it inspired a new generation of Canadian filmmakers.

The Yorkton Short Film and Video Festival is the longest running film festival in North America. In the 60 years of its existence the festival has developed a tradition of recognizing excellent films and providing great professional development and learning opportunities. The Festival recognizes outstanding Canadian short films and rewards the very best with the annual Golden Sheaf Awards. Visit www.yorktonshortfilm.org for more information.

For more information please contact:
Fay Kowal
Executive Director
Email: director@yorktonshortfilm.org
Telephone: (306) 782-7077

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