Oct 122011

Bluegreen Vegas Resort, Bluegreen Club 36 Prepares for 2011 Vegas Cine Fest Film Festival











Bluegreen Vegas Resort, Bluegreen Club 36 Prepares for 2011 Vegas Cine Fest Film Festival


Boca Raton, FL (PRWEB) August 25, 2011

Bluegreen Corporation (NYSE: BXG), a leading provider of Colorful Places to Live and Play, today announced its Las Vegas resort, Bluegreen Club 36, is a prime location for owners to stay while attending the Vegas Cine Fest Film Festival and Awards event, August 25-27, 2011.

Hosted by the Vegas Film Society, the Vegas Cine Fest Film Festival was created to help foster and encourage young, independent film writers and artists. The purpose of the festival is to provide a platform for artists to share their stories and work with the local community. Located at the Tropicana Hotel and Casino, the 2011 Vegas Cine Film Festival and Awards is a three-day event where attendees can preview films and discover new talent in the film industry.

Bluegreen owners, who would like to attend the 2011 Vegas Cine Film Festival and Awards, will be fortunate with where they will be staying. Bluegreen Club 36 is just a short distance from the Tropicana and is strategically located at latitude 36 degrees north (hence its name), a few blocks off the brilliant Vegas Strip. Its location puts resort owners within steps to Vegas’ main attractions.

“The 2011 Vegas Cine Film Festival and Awards should provide an artistic atmosphere and vibe for our owners,” said Alex Canales, Regional Vice President for Bluegreen Corporation. “Our Bluegreen travel guides will be able to help with directions to this great vacation experience.”

ABOUT BLUEGREEN CORPORATION

Founded in 1966 and headquartered in Boca Raton, FL, Bluegreen Corporation (NYSE: BXG) is the leader in providing Colorful Places to Live and Play through its vacation ownership resort and residential real estate business segments. Our more than 3,500 employees are passionate about delivering extraordinary experiences for our owners, travelers and business partners. Since 1996, Bluegreen has managed, marketed and sold a flexible, real estate-based vacation ownership plan with more than 160,000 owners, over 54 owned or managed resorts, and access to more than 4,000 resorts worldwide. Since 1985, Bluegreen Communities has developed master-planned residential and golf communities primarily in the southern and southeastern U.S., and has sold over 55,000 homesites. We also offer a portfolio of comprehensive, turnkey, fee-for-service resort management, financial services, customer generation and sales solutions to third-party developers and lenders. For more information, visit us online at http://www.bluegreencorp.com. See what Bluegreen owners are saying on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

# # #





















Vocus©Copyright 1997-, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







More Short Film Press Releases

Copied from SQLJ » Short Film Press Releases

Oct 102011
short film
by TheFemGeek

Analysis of the Cinematography, Colour, Film Noir, Painting and Light of “Rajeev Jain ICS WICA” – The Best, Famous, Greatest and Top Indian Cinematographer of all time

Cinematography literally means “lighting in movement”. It is often referred to as painting or writing with light. The cinematographer on a film, otherwise known as the Director of Photography or “DP”, has a wide range of options when it comes to selecting how the film will be shot and how the “look” of the film will be determined. The use of tonality, speed of motion and perspective are included in these options, as is lighting.

Lighting is central to cinematography and can have a number of functions in a film’s narrative; for example, it can highlight a number or important characters or objects within a frame by drawing the audience’s attention to them with the use of a bright light source. It can also create a range of atmospheric qualities in a scene, which can contribute to both characterisation and setting.

The cinematographer (an alternative term is ‘lighting cameraman’) is the principal operator within the camera crew.

Three Point Lighting : The classical Bollywood studio film is an example of three-point lighting – key, fill and back lights used in combination to light the subject. Three-point lighting is the most commonly used lighting scheme and it can enable us to understand how lighting affects one’s perception of a character or a setting.

The key light is the main source of illumination, but if used alone it will leaves shadows.

Another light is therefore required to fill in these areas of darkness and to soften the shadows the key light has cast. This has become known as the fill light, a secondary light source of slightly less intensity than the key light which is placed at eye level.

Yet even this combination of key and fill light is must be supplemented further if a director is seeking to create a sense of depth. The third light source that provides the necessary depth is known as the back light, as it is placed above and behind the subject. Used on its own, the back light alone would create a silhouette of the subject. But the triple combination of key, fill and back lights, separates the subject from its environment and creates a feeling of depth.

Lighting techniques can be divided into high key or low key categories. A low contrast ratio of key and fill light will result in an image of almost uniform brightness. This is termed high key lighting. This is a standard, conventional lighting scheme employed in Bollywood musical genres (film with songs).

A high contrast ratio of key and fill light will result in low-key lighting, producing dark shadows and a night time effect, faces will often be bleached white against a black background. Genres such as horror and film noir employ low-key lighting for its atmospheric shadows and intense contrast of light and darkness.

Cinematographers use light and shade to direct the audience’s attention to a particular part of the filmic space. Lighting can often be used as a characteristic of the style of a whole film or over a number of scenes. The classic Bollywood film is usually characterised by a full lighting effect – high key lighting. This approach to lighting was developed in the early days of the studio system to ensure that all of the money spent on creating the image, designing the set, etc, could clearly be seen.

The use of low-key lighting to create shadows and atmospheric effects originated in Indian Expressionist cinema. These stylised techniques were incorporated into the Bollywood style of lighting in the 1970s and 1980s in a series of films that later became collectively known as film noir. Many of these films were directed by Indian émigré directors who had worked on the original Indian Expressionist films.

Deep focus cinematography is a technique used to keep several planes of the shot in focus at the same time (foreground, medium ground, background). By allowing several actions to be filmed simultaneously, deep focus cinematography offers an alternative approach to the use of editing to present actions in a series of separate shots. More often than not, directors employ a combination of deep focus cinematography with extended long takes to enable them to dispense with editing. Some directors, such as Manika Sharma, use these techniques in order to generate a better, more assured performance from the actors.

Kalpvriksh – The Wishing Tree This film is an example of low-key lighting. He employs this lighting style throughout the film to creates a mood of threat and danger. The opening sequence of Rain Forest provides a useful introduction to the art of cinematography. The film includes many examples of both high key and low-key lighting.

In the work of Rajiv Jain, the long take and deep focus cinematography are combined to create stunning compositions. Rajiv Jain is one of the most celebrated director of photography in film history and his film, Kalpvriksh – The Wishing Tree has been consistently the best film ever made. In this famous scene from Kalpvriksh – The Wishing Tree, Rajiv uses the long take with deep focus cinematography to execute a brilliantly expressive backward tracking camera move and keep three planes of the shot constantly in focus – the young boy Shawn in the background; his father in the medium ground; and his mother (character played by Shernaz Patel ) in the foreground. This technique is also known as composition in depth and for Rajiv it was an aesthetic in itself.
 
The Influence of Rembrandt : For cinematographer like me, as well as generations of art lovers, Rembrandt is the acknowledged master of light and shadow. His chiaroscuro technique has influenced some of the most important light-cameramen in cinema history. In her study of the relationship between painting and the cinema, ‘Moving Pictures’, Rajiv Jain argues that without the paintings of the 17th century Dutch master, many of the masterpieces of the cinema would not have been possible.

“Beginning in the 15th century, used light as if it was alive, inviting it and coaxing it to expand and create its own visions. Light and shade, the essential components of photographic and cinematographic art, were first given their true freedom by Rembrandt, their decisive enlargement into the imaginative world. Moving camera poetry was made possible by him. It was Rembrandt who single-handedly raised the stakes, and set the standard the camera would have to meet.”

Rajiv Jain points to paintings by Rembrandt such as examples of artwork which generates a deep emotional response in the viewer through the play of light and shadow: “Inspired lighting puts the atmosphere into motion, so that it overflows the space and reaches toward the viewer; meanwhile the figure style and compositional mode suggest continuous motion in a shifting frame. The result is moving drama without strong colour, vigorous action or surface detail.”

Award winning cinematographer Rajiv, have spoken about the  influence of Rembrandt on his approach to lighting. Recent feature on the work of Rajiv Jain in which he discusses his love of painters such as Vermeer and Rembrandt: “I believe that if they had existed today, these painters would have been magnificent cameramen. Most of the painters used a front light which is 45 degrees high which went onto the face making a shadow under the nose. Here you can see a painting by Rembrandt that uses the same lighting as this photo image of Marlene Dietrich. Even in Kalpvriksh – The Wishing Tree, the same lighting was used on Shabana Azmi. “

Kalpvriksh – The Wishing Tree This unsettling film explores the dangers of both emotional restraint and unchecked passion. This is one of the most visually stunning films ever made. This scene is a famous example of Rajiv Jain’s expressionist technique. Rajiv discusses his approach to lighting in the Kalpvriksh – The Wishing Tree and analyses a number of key scenes from Old Tree to New Tree that employ chiaroscuro techniques derived from his study of the paintings of Rembrandt.

From Indian Expressionism to Film Noir : The term Expressionism has a deep resonance in the history of the cinema.

The journey of Indian Expressionism from art cinema to the Bollywood mainstream began with the exile and expulsion of many film producers, directors, writers, actors, and music composers from India. These Indian émigrés had a significant artistic influence on Bollywood filmmaking. This influence was most clearly felt, in the existence of that famous ‘Expressionist’ genre, the film noir,

The term film noir was first coined by film critics to describe a daring and stylish new type of Bollywood crime thriller, Standard histories describe film noir as a synthesis of hardboiled crime fiction and Indian expressionism. The term is also associated, “with certain visual and narrative traits, including low-key photography, images of wet city streets and romantic fascination with femme fatales.” Some commentators believe that noir began much earlier and that it has never gone away.

“No filmmaker has conveyed more powerfully than Lang a sense of overwhelming entrapment, of a world whose every circumstance, every twist and turning, every corner and corridor, seem to conspire against the individual and draw him or her more deeply into a spider’s web.”

It is the visual style of film noir, rather than story or character type, that is seen as its defining characteristic. The noir look was created by cinematographers, costume designers, art directors and production designers. Its enduring influence on all genres of Bollywood filmmaking can be seen today.

The visual style of film noir, “is characterised by unbalanced and disturbing frame compositions, strong contrasts of light and dark, the prevalence of shadows and areas of darkness within the frame, the visual tension created by curious camera angles and so forth. Moreover, in film noir, these strained compositions and angles are not merely embellishments or rhetorical flourishes, but form the very substance of the film.”

The noir world is corrupt, threatening and violent. Film critics saw the typical noir narrative as an existential nightmare from which the protagonist can never awaken. He is a doomed figure journeying through an underworld of crime and deception until the final betrayal by the femme fatale that he has fallen for. Expressionist lighting schemes and camera angles convey a sense of entrapment as the hero makes his way through an often labyrinthine plot.

In film noir, Expressionism found a worthy subject in the archetypal Indian antihero “The visual style of film noir conveys the dominant mood (male psychological instability and moral uncertainty, paranoia, claustrophobia, a sense of doom and hopelessness, etc) through expressive use of darkness: both real, in predominantly under lit and night time scenes, and psychologically through shadows and claustrophobic compositions which overwhelm the character in exterior as well as interior settings. Characters (and we in the audience) are given little opportunity to orientate themselves to the threatening and shifting shadowy environment. Silhouettes, shadows, mirrors and reflections (generally darker than the reflected person) indicate his lack of both unity and control. They suggest a doppelganger, a dark ghost, alter ego or distorted side of man’s personality that will emerge in the dark street at night to destroy him. The sexual, dangerous woman lives in this darkness, and is the psychological expression of his own internal fears of sexuality, and his need to control and repress it.”

Painting with Light: Rajiv Jain : Rajiv Jain is considered by many to be the greatest of all noir cinematographers. Rajiv Jain perfected many of stylised camera and lighting techniques of film noir, including radical camera angles, wide-angle lenses, deep focus compositions, the baroque use of low-level cameras and a sharp depth of field. His groundbreaking work with director Anthony Mann on films such T-Men, Raw Deal and He Walked by Night is considered a benchmark in the noir genre.

Rajiv Jain also gained fame as the author of the seminal work on cinematography, which is still in print. In the book, Rajiv discusses the importance of ‘Cinematography, Colour, Film Noir, Painting and Light‘. There are examples of this lighting composition in his films with Manika Sharma and in the noir classic, Kalpvriksh – The Wishing Tree. Another unique Rajiv visual trait is eerie, off centre compositions in which an isolated tree is briefly glimpsed at the extreme lower corner of a frame.

For Further Reading : http://www.rajeevjain.com/

About the Author:

Vijendra Katheria  is a Delhi-based cinematographer and author. He teaches cinematography and advanced film production at Asian Academy of Film and Television, New Delhi, as well as a course through the Extension entitled, “Cinematography for Directors.” Vijendra has shot numerous short films, independent feature films and documentaries that have screened in film festivals around the world. He has also taken on the role of producer, director, and editor on many projects.

Tags: kalpvriksh, the wish tree, manika sharma, rajeev jain, indian cinematographer, indian director of photography, indian dop

Find More Short Film Articles

Copied from SQLJ » Short Film Articles

Oct 082011



xml:lang=”en” lang=”en” xmlns=”http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml”>

Skip the Expensive Night Out & Have a Cozy Night In with Film Movement’s DVD-of-the-Month Club










Hoboken, NJ (PRWEB) January 21, 2009

A Film Movement membership allows you to enjoy award-winning films from around the world. Each month you will receive, to own, the best independent and foreign films straight from the world’s top film festivals–such as Cannes, Sundance, Berlin and Tribeca. You will receive the films either before or at the same time that they are in theaters. Plus, every DVD comes with a short film.

Film Movement is the only first-run, film-of-the-month club for award-winning independent and foreign films that are popular film festival favorites, but might not make it to ‘a theater near you.’

A Film Movement membership allows you to experience the top foreign and independent films first, before they are available in theaters and long before they are available to the general public on DVD (via Netflix, Blockbuster or Amazon). Such films include “The Way I Spent The End Of The World” executively produced by Martin Scorsese and Wim Wenders, “The Party’s Over” starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, “Long Life, Happiness And Prosperity” starring Grey’s Anatomy’s Sandra Oh, and summer sensation Ellen Page in “Wilby Wonderful.” Members also receive award-winning International favorites.

In addition to a feature film, each monthly DVD comes with a short film from a hot new director. Previous shorts in the Film Movement Series include the first films from both Sofia Coppola (“Lost in Translation”) and Mike Mills (“Thumbsucker”).

Film Movement memberships are available in 3, 6 or 12-month subscriptions at 20 percent off – as little as $ 12.00 per month including shipping and handling.

Include http://www.filmmovement.com/pr.asp

###









Attachments

















Vocus©Copyright 1997-, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







Copied from SQLJ » Short Film Press Releases

Oct 082011



xml:lang=”en” lang=”en” xmlns=”http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml”>

Round Two in Deep Ellum: Festival Winners Vale and Osborne are Back With The Sequel










Dallas, TX (PRWEB) November 16, 2005

After reviewing the list of 2005 short films, writer/producer Eric Vale of Five Ton Ed Productions and director Brad Osborne of Innuendo Films have discovered that their latest project, ‘Sole Possessions,’ has been selected for the Deep Ellum Film Festival (DEF) in Dallas. The film is the sequel to ‘Interstate,’ which won ‘Best in Texas Short’ at the festival in 2004. ‘Sole Possessions’ received its official world premiere at the New York City Horror Film Festival in October of this year.

‘Sole Possessions’ stars Elise Baughman (Dragon Ball GT, Kiddy Grade) as a woman who discovers – through a seemingly romantic dinner conversation – that she’s nothing more than a figment of her companion’s imagination. Dameon Clarke (A Scanner Darkly, The Alamo, Secondhand Lions) is her controlling boyfriend, a character who fabricates individuals on an as-needed basis. Over the course of the meal, a frightening truth is revealed as the film’s heroine struggles to remember how she became a victim of deception. “What if your life, your thoughts, your very existence were all imagined?” states Vale. ’Sole Possessions’ examines the human psyche, taking the phrase “This can’t be real…” to the extreme.

In addition to his career as a writer for anime television and videogame projects, Dallas-native Eric Vale produced ‘Indefinitely’ in 2001 and wrote/produced ‘Interstate’ in 2004. Director Brad Osborne has worked with Vale on multiple short film and feature film projects. The duo has plans to create a third production that will complete the ‘Interstate’ trilogy and is currently producing ‘The Dying Breed,’ a feature film.

A part of DEF’s ‘Shorts Block 5,’ ‘Sole Possessions’ will be screened at 7:30pm on Monday, November 21st at the Landmark Magnolia Theater in Dallas’s West Village.

For more information regarding ‘Interstate,’ ‘Sole Possessions,’ or Innuendo Films, please visit http://www.innuendofilms.com. For information about the Deep Ellum Film Festival, visit http://www.def2.org. For media and public relations enquiries, contact Christina Alexandra at 214.642.5935.

###


















Vocus©Copyright 1997-, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







Copied from SQLJ » Short Film Press Releases

Oct 072011

by Dallas Film Society Images

Shanghai, with its colorful lights and vibrant ambiance, is undoubtedly one of the worlds leading cities and among the most populated in China. Its historical treats and intriguing sites do not fail to present a thrilling experience for the eager traveller. Among its fine attractions, witness one of the largest and most glamorous film festivals in Asia, known as the Shanghai International Film Festival (SIFF). Founded in the year 1993, it is famous for being China’s only A- category international film festival accredited by the FIAPF.

Held in June each year, the Shanghai International Film Festival is an event in which filmmakers and visitors world wide take pride in attending. With the growth of the Chinese film industry, this has become an international platform where four main programs are held. This includes competition which consists of the ‘Golden Goblet Award’ and the ‘Asian New Talent Award’. These awards aim to inspire new talent as well as creativity and the competition is judged by exceptional celebrities around the globe.

Another program called ‘SIFF Mart’ is one made up of China Film Pitch, Catch (CFPC Film Market), and Co-production Film Pitch and Catch (Co-FPC). It is the most specialized film trade launch and attracts international buyers, producers and distributers. It helps in attracting potential investors to film projects and also helps in discovering fresh skills. Furthermore, the SIF forum which follows the principle ‘China’s way and worlds value’ serves the industry and is considered to be the most significant platform. It is divided into four parts, namely the Keynote Seminar, President Lecture, Master Class and Round Table. In addition, there is the International Film Panorama which includes sections known as Official selection, Global Village, Tribute to Masters, View China and Spectrum. There are diverse styles seen in the films that are presented in this section and it presents an opportunity to make the public and media aware of the latest in international cinema.

Make your stay in Shanghai worthwhile by choosing a fabulous Shanghai serviced residence. If you are looking for a comfortable Business accommodation Shanghai, the ideal place would be the Somerset Xu Hui, which offers you a luxurious and delightful stay.

Copied from SQLJ » Short Film Articles

Oct 042011
short film
by zoethustra

As the last decade of the nineteenth century approached, the world had photography and we have all seen how basic photographs were taken in films portraying the Wild West in the USA. What did not exist were the moving pictures which later gave us that portrayal. There was theatre and dances scripts written and performed live in front of an audience. Such entertainment was centuries old but a whole new world was dawning and just over a century on, it is all pervasive.

The first attempt at moving photographs may well have been when an attempt was made to discover whether a horse’s gallop ever involved all four hooves off the ground so a series of photographs were taken by a series of cameras with a trip wire touched by the hooves themselves to take the shots. Those shots were put together, a form of film.

Shortly afterwards a camera was developed that could take ten photographs per second using a film that was perforated. People began to see the possibilities and wrestled with the problems of actually achieving action until a device developed in Thomas Edison’s laboratory succeeded in 1891. However it was a device which involved the viewer putting his eye to the peep hole; one viewer a time was hardly likely to be a commercial success. So how did the medium that has developed so much to give us live news’ coverage, cult movies and blockbusters emerge?

Well, other innovators and inventors were also looking to produce something and the first successful showing to an audience in fact took place in Paris just four years’ later, two French brothers, the Lumiere brothers having created something that not only took and developed film, it could also project that film. That gave impetus to other inventors and very soon there were a series of such pieces, generally working on a standard sixteen shots per second.

The film films produced tended to be fairly boring in terms of their content it was the equipment itself that was the exciting element. Nothing of any great length was produced in the early days. Viewing for the audience meant a series of very short films often of everyday life, but from different parts of the world, largely documentary based. A whole show may not last more than half an hour and that show might be the only option for weeks until a new set of films was available and the process began again.

Imagine the contrast between that, the expectant audience waiting for a change in the content as eagerly as a century later, the cinema addict awaits the release of the latest cult movies. It was the only visual alternative then other than concerts and plays performed by a travelling troupe or singing and playing within the family at home. There was much progress to be made but the media and film revolution has begun.

More Short Film Articles

Copied from SQLJ » Short Film Articles

Oct 042011

Some cool independant film images:

20080613 HG_9

20080613 HG_99

Related Independant Film Images

Copied from SQLJ » Film Images

Oct 042011



xml:lang=”en” lang=”en” xmlns=”http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml”>

Skip the Expensive Night Out & Have a Cozy Night In with Film Movement’s DVD-of-the-Month Club










Hoboken, NJ (PRWEB) January 21, 2009

A Film Movement membership allows you to enjoy award-winning films from around the world. Each month you will receive, to own, the best independent and foreign films straight from the world’s top film festivals–such as Cannes, Sundance, Berlin and Tribeca. You will receive the films either before or at the same time that they are in theaters. Plus, every DVD comes with a short film.

Film Movement is the only first-run, film-of-the-month club for award-winning independent and foreign films that are popular film festival favorites, but might not make it to ‘a theater near you.’

A Film Movement membership allows you to experience the top foreign and independent films first, before they are available in theaters and long before they are available to the general public on DVD (via Netflix, Blockbuster or Amazon). Such films include “The Way I Spent The End Of The World” executively produced by Martin Scorsese and Wim Wenders, “The Party’s Over” starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, “Long Life, Happiness And Prosperity” starring Grey’s Anatomy’s Sandra Oh, and summer sensation Ellen Page in “Wilby Wonderful.” Members also receive award-winning International favorites.

In addition to a feature film, each monthly DVD comes with a short film from a hot new director. Previous shorts in the Film Movement Series include the first films from both Sofia Coppola (“Lost in Translation”) and Mike Mills (“Thumbsucker”).

Film Movement memberships are available in 3, 6 or 12-month subscriptions at 20 percent off – as little as $ 12.00 per month including shipping and handling.

Include http://www.filmmovement.com/pr.asp

###









Attachments

















Vocus©Copyright 1997-, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







Copied from SQLJ » Short Film Press Releases

Oct 042011



xml:lang=”en” lang=”en” xmlns=”http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml”>

‘Homeland’ The Movie Begins Filming in Massachusetts Former New Bedford – Somerset Residents Bring ‘Hollywood’ Home










Los Angeles (PRWEB) April 2, 2008

“Homeland,” a dramatic view of post-9/11 paranoia, will begin filming in New Bedford, Massachusetts on April 5th under the direction of area ex-pat Don Burton. In addition to local businesses being used as an additional character, the film will be shot entirely by local film crews.

“Homeland” tells the story of a young man who makes a routine stop at his local cafe after a long, cold day at work. After ordering, he sits with an apparent suicide bomber who forces him to ask himself: “Am I living the life I was meant to live?”

Set in coastal New Bedford, Massachusetts, “Homeland” will be filmed at “On a Roll,” cafe. The location engages viewers with anticipation and familiarity: this restaurant could be your corner cafe.

“It’s important for us to film in a community that gives viewers a sense of familiarity,” said Don Burton, Producer/Director. “But, our most important goal is to build a bridge from Hollywood to the community that saw us grow and create opportunities for future film productions in the area.”

“Homeland” Writer/Producer Adam P. Cray also stars in the film as The Repairman. Cray has directed & acted in several short films including “My First” & “Two Devils Lunch”. Cray, a former resident of Westport & New Bedford, is a University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth alum (’97).

“Homeland” also features Tommy Whalen as Kevin. Whalen has written, directed and acted in various film projects, including “Pennywise”, “Last Seen” and featurettes for NBC’s “Heroes.” Whalen, a former Dighton resident, is a University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth alum (’07).

Producer/Director Don Burton is a creative director and editor who has worked on over 50 DVD featurettes for titles that include the 2007 Independent Spirit Award winner “Talk To Me,” “Taxi Driver” and “Pretty Woman”. Burton has co-produced documentaries in Brazil and Europe and edited the feature film “Ranchero” premiering March 2007 at the Sacramento International Film Festival. Burton is a former Somerset resident and graduated from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (’97).

“Homeland” is a collaborative project between Burton’s Flickering Spaces and Cray’s Cinemastar Productions.

About Flickering Spaces

Launched in 2001, Flickering Spaces is an online portal for film and fine arts projects. Flickering Spaces provides an ‘online’ portfolio feature that showcases current and past collaborative projects.

About Cinemastar Productions

Founded in 1998, Cinemastar Productions has produced various films, music videos, PSAs, & trailers including “Last Seen”, “Alarma” & “This Boy of Ours”.

For further information & to coordinate interviews, please contact: Ana Lydia Ochoa, “Homeland” The Movie, Media Relations, padma media & marketing, 1.310.598.5735

###


















Vocus©Copyright 1997-, Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.
Vocus, PRWeb, and Publicity Wire are trademarks or registered trademarks of Vocus, Inc. or Vocus PRW Holdings, LLC.







More Short Film Press Releases

Copied from SQLJ » Short Film Press Releases

Oct 012011
short film
by Profound Whatever

The progression of technology and the relatively small attention span consumers have these days has made film channels like YouTube immensely popular. Marketers everywhere have been scrambling to go viral by creating engaging short films, whether comedic or informative, to help out with brand awareness. BMW, one of the most well-known luxury brands out there, is delving into its own marketing tangent, a little side project known as the BMW Documentary Film Series. Philadelphia BMW owners have already had a chance to watch the first installment of the series, called “The New City,” and it seems like many people have found it informative and engaging. What “The New City” attempts to do is to put urban living in perspective while giving us a taste of the progression that has yet to occur – including more efficient means of transportation and living. It discusses why cities have become so popular, citing reasons like mutually beneficial living arrangements and general accessibility of amenities and other things necessary for living. Your Philadelphia BMW dealership believes that the film offers some great insights for people living in the City of Brotherly Love.

 

“The New City” is only part one of an ongoing documentary series created by BMW’s team of marketers and creative types. The series is a great marketing tool to help out with branding initiatives that leverage new media as their driving channels. Philadelphia BMW addicts are excited for the next addition to the documentary series, which enthusiasts think will be a solid one following the release of “The New City.” According to the press release, “Additional chapters will appear each Tuesday throughout the month of February. To allow viewers to better engage with the films and to add to the ongoing dialogue, BMW designed an innovative new video player specifically for the films.  Viewers can access additional content around a theme, quote, or speaker in real time, while giving them the option to pause the main viewer. Additionally, they can also post their own thoughts or comments directly to specific moments of the film for others to see and react.” The first film looks at the concept of “megacities” (cities with more than 15 million inhabitants) and talks about the need for more room and more efficient living. Your Philadelphia BMW dealership was especially titillated by the talk of computer driven cars and what the future holds for the driving industry.

 

So what exactly does the future hold for driving? Well, we hope to explore a little more of these things in the next few installments of the BMW Documentary Film Series. Philadelphia BMW drivers believe that these films are done well enough to become their own primetime specials, but the short segments make it easier for the films to go viral, simultaneously making them more accessible to a wider audience. Your Philadelphia BMW dealership has had a preview of the rest of the films, and they expect that these should have no trouble going viral either. So get enlightened and check out “The New City” anywhere good movies are found online.

Related Short Film Articles

Copied from SQLJ » Short Film Articles

© 2014 YORKTON SHORT FILM Suffusion WordPress theme by Sayontan Sinha

Powered by Yahoo! Answers